German Company Under Investigation For Bribery In Turkish Submarine Deal

State Prosecutors of the city state Bremen have opened a second front in their case against Atlas Elektronik.

Authorities are investigating Atlas Elektronik a joint venture between ThyssenKrupp and Airbus since 2013, for possible kickbacks in the submarine business with Greece. Some irregularities came on with Turkish Reis class (Type 214) project according to the spokesperson of Bremen City Prosecutor’s Office.

It is suspected that the company may have bribed Turkish officials. On 16 February 2016, related business documents and data material was confiscated from the Headquarters of Atlas Electronic in Bremen.
on the premises safe.

The investigations in Greece revealed that bribes totaling €62 million paid for armament contracts between 2000 and 2007.

In Turkish Type 214 project Atlas Elektronik is responsible for delivering very critical and highly specialized combat management system ISUS-90/72 and active and passive sonars.

It is too early to say whether this new investigation will have any negative effects on delivery of Atlas Electronic supplied items.

Advertisements

Warships In The Eastern Mediterranean (Part 2)

This is the list of the naval vessels in the region i.e. east of Crete as of 17 September 2013:

Russian Navy:

  • 548 Admiral Panteleyev, destroyer
  • 810 Smetlivy, destroyer
  • 712 Neustrashimy, frigate
  • 127 Minsk, large landing ship
  • 142 Novocharkassk, large landing ship
  • 055 Admiral Nevelskoi, large landing ship Back in the Black Sea
  • 077 Peresvet, large landing ship Back in the Black Sea
  • 110 Aleksandr Shabalin, large landing ship Back in the Marmara Sea
  • 151 Azov, large landing ship, in the Baltics
  • SSV-201 Priazove, intelligence gathering ship
  • PM-138, repair ship
  • MB-304, tug
  • Pechenga, tanker
  • 152 Nikolay Filchenkov, large landing ship

US Navy:

  • DDG-52 USS Barry, destroyer
  • DDG-107 USS Gravely, destroyer
  • DDG-61 USS Ramage, destroyer
  • DDG-55 USS Stout, destroyer
  • LPD-17 USS San Antonio, amphibious transport dock
  • T-AO-195 USNS Leroy Grumman, supply ship

German Navy:

  • P-6126 FGS Frettchen, fast attack craft, UNIFIL
  • P-6129 FGS Wiesel, fast attack craft, UNIFIL
  • A-53 FGS Oker, intelligence gathering ship

Royal Navy:

  • L-3008 RFA Mounts Bay, auxiliary landing ship, Cougar 2013
  • D-35 HMS Dragon, destroyer

Brazilian Navy

  • F-45 União, frigate, UNIFIL

Bangladeshi Navy

  • F-18 BNS Osman, frigate, UNIFIL
  • P-911 BNS Madhumati, large patrol craft, UNIFIL

Indonesian Navy

  • 365 KRI Diponegoro, corvette, UNIFIL

Greek Navy

  • P-69 HS Ypoploiarchos Kristallidis, fast attack craft, UNIFIL

French Navy

  • D-621 FS Chevalier Paul, frigate

Italian Navy

  • D-553 ITS Andera Doria, destroyer

Any additions and corrections to the list are welcomed.

Warships In The Eastern Mediterranean

As the bulk of the Royal Navy’s Response Force Task Group passes through the Suez Canal, and Russia sending two more warships southwards, it is time to update the list of the ships in East Mediterranean

This is the list of the naval vessels in the region i.e. east of Crete:

Russian Navy:

  • 548 Admiral Panteleyev, destroyer
  • 127 Minsk, large landing ship
  • 142 Novocharkassk, large landing ship
  • 055 BDK-98, large landing ship
  • 077 Peresvet, large landing ship
  • 151 Azov, large landing ship
  • SSV-201 Priazove, intelligence gathering ship
  • PM-138, repair ship
  • MB-304, tug
  • Pechenga, tanker
  • 810 Smetlivy, destroyer – ETA 3 days
  • 152 Nikolay Filchenkov, large landing ship – ETA 3 days

US Navy:

  • DDG-52 USS Barry, destroyer
  • DDG-107 USS Gravely, destroyer
  • DDG-61 USS Ramage, destroyer
  • DDG-55 USS Stout, destroyer
  • LPD-17 USS San Antonio, amphibious transport dock
  • T-AO-195 USNS Leroy Grumman, supply ship

German Navy:

  • P-6126 FGS Frettchen, fast attack craft, UNIFIL
  • P-6129 FGS Wiesel, fast attack craft, UNIFIL
  • A-53 FGS Oker, intelligence gathering ship

Royal Navy:

  • L-3008 RFA Mounts Bay, auxiliary landing ship, Cougar 2013
  • L-3007 RFA Lyme Bay, auxiliary landing ship, Cougar 2013
  • L-15 HMS Bulward, landing ship, Cougar 2013
  • F-236 HMS Montrose, frigate, Cougar 2013

Brazilian Navy

  • F-45 União, frigate, UNIFIL

Bangladeshi Navy

  • F-18 BNS Osman, frigate, UNIFIL
  • P-911 BNS Madhumati, large patrol craft, UNIFIL

Indonesian Navy

  • 365 KRI Diponegoro, corvette, UNIFIL

Greek Navy

  • P-69 HS Ypoploiarchos Kristallidis, fast attack craft, UNIFIL

French Navy

  • D-621 FS Chevalier Paul, destroyer

Italian Navy

  • D-553 ITS Andera Doria, destroyer

Any additions and corrections to the list are welcomed.

The Situation In The Eastern Mediterranean (Part 12)

After my first post of the ships in East Mediterranean, I have received numerous responses in forms of blog comments and tweets. I thank every one who contributed.

This is the list of the naval vessels in the region i.e. east of Crete:

Russian Navy:

  • 548 Admiral Panteleyev, destroyer
  • 127 Minsk, large landing ship
  • 142 Novocharkassk, large landing ship
  • 055 BDK-98, large landing ship
  • 077 Peresvet, large landing ship
  • 151 Azov, large landing ship
  • SSV-201 Priazove, intelligence gathering ship
  • PM-138, repair ship
  • MB-304, tug
  • Pechenga, tanker

US Navy:

  • DDG-52 USS Barry, destroyer
  • DDG-107 USS Gravely, destroyer
  • DDG-61 USS Ramage, destroyer
  • DDG-55 USS Stout, destroyer
  • LPD-17 USS San Antonio, amphibious transport dock
  • T-AO-195 USNS Leroy Grumman, supply ship

German Navy:

  • P-6126 FGS Frettchen, fast attack craft, UNIFIL
  • P-6129 FGS Wiesel, fast attack craft, UNIFIL
  • A-53 FGS Oker, intelligence gathering ship

Royal Navy:

  • L-3008 RFA Mounts Bay, auxiliary landing ship, Cougar 2013
  • L-3007 RFA Lyme Bay, auxiliary landing ship, Cougar 2013
  • L-15 HMS Bulward, landing ship, Cougar 2013
  • F-236 HMS Montrose, frigate, Cougar 2013

Brazilian Navy

  • F-45 União, frigate, UNIFIL

Bangladeshi Navy

  • F-18 BNS Osman, frigate, UNIFIL
  • P-911 BNS Madhumati, large patrol craft, UNIFIL

Indonesian Navy

  • 365 KRI Diponegoro, corvette, UNIFIL

Greek Navy

  • P-69 HS Ypoploiarchos Kristallidis, fast attack craft, UNIFIL

French Navy

  • D-621 FS Chevalier Paul, destroyer

Italian Navy

  • D-553 ITS Andera Doria, destroyer

Any additions and corrections to the list are welcomed.

Is This Necrophilia?

I know what necrophilia means. But I think the word’s definition needs some rewriting especially, after reading DCNS’ intention to sell FREMM class frigates to Greece:

France wants to deliver two to four new frigates to the Greek navy and to allow the highly indebted nation to postpone payment of the €300 million ($412 million) purchase price per ship for the next five years.

 Under the deal, Greece will have the option of paying up after five years, with a significant discount of €100 million, or returning them to the French navy. The “stealth” frigates are designed to avoid detection by enemy radar and are built by state-owned French defense company DCNS.

Well the French consider themselves as good lovers and an authority on almost everything about l’amour. I didn’t know that this expertise also included loving of the dead. Well any way they are not alone in this business:

The [French] deal is being criticized by German rivals that have been competing for the contract for years.

In a letter to the German government, an executive from the ThyssenKrupp group complained that the vessel purchase will in effect be co-financed by German taxpayers because Greece, reliant on aid from the European Union and International Monetary Fund, may have to restructure its debts.

A Greek debt haircut is looking increasingly likely. If this happens and Greece is rescued again with funds from the European bailout mechanisms, Thyssen’s scenario would come true. German taxpayers would shoulder part of Greece’s government spending and thereby be forced to pay for a portion of the frigate purchase.

“While German naval shipyards aren’t getting any orders, DCNS and Greek shipyards are being subsidized and kept alive, probably with German money in the end,” the ThyssenKrupp executive said.

Uwe Beckmeyer, a member of parliament from the the center-left Social Democrats, says German jobs are at stake and called on Chancellor Angela Merkel to get French President Nicolas Sarkozy to abandon the ship sale. “The Chancellor must stop her friend Sarkozy,” said Beckmeyer.

So the Germans think they can beat the French in “love-making”. This is something I would like to see.

While France and Germany bicker about who is going to make love to the corpse, sell warships to Greece, this is the hard reality:

Greek unions began a 48-hour general strike on Wednesday, the biggest protest in years, as parliament prepares to vote on sweeping new austerity measures designed to stave off a default that could trigger a crisis in the wider euro zone.

The strike shut government departments, businesses, public services and even providers of everyday staples like shops and bakeries and will culminate in mass demonstrations outside parliament, which was the scene of violent clashes in June.

The industrial action comes as European Union leaders scramble to set the outlines of a new rescue package in time for a summit on Sunday that hopes to agree measures to protect the region’s financial system from a potential Greek debt default.

Greece’s Prime Minister George Papandreou made a final appeal for support late on Tuesday, comparing the situation facing Greece to a war and telling deputies in the ruling PASOK party that it was their duty to support the tough new measures.

Submarines: A New Tool For Redistribution Of Wealth Among Nations

HS Papanikolis in Kiel before her delivery to Greek Navy in 2010.

The submarine deal, Greece made with Germany back in 1998 is continuing to make headlines.

Last time when the project was in headlines was in May. At that time the German DA’s were accusing several former executives of Ferrostaal, the Germany firm that was part of the consortium which won the contract, for paying kickbacks to secure the deal, which was worth just over 1.2 billion euros.

There is nothing about it neither in German or in Greek media.

This the time this notorious submarine deal was brought to headlines by Mr.  Christos Kirtsos the editor of the Greek daily Free Citypress  While his writings do not add much new to what we already know but it makes a very good case how such big defense acquisition projects are used as tools for redistribution of wealth among the nations.

The first order for four Type 214 submarines was made by Simitis government, with Minister of Defense Mr. Tsochatzopoulos, who controls pay for “golden” signatures who placed. The government then considered “emergency” supply of German submarines and has advanced 75% of total costs. Thus, the Greek state has paid a decade ago to 1.5 billion €, while we have not yet taken delivery of the German submarines.

The squandering of public money to complete Papandreou government to order another two submarines of type 214, cost 1 billion.

The order of six German submarines Type 214 used by the PASOK governments to develop “industry” black money and political support to the “achievements” of workers in the shipyards of Scaramanga in the name of the Greek added value. In fact, two thirds of the revenue created by the acquisition of these submarines were recovered by German shipyards, while Skaramangas gradually cut off from the Greek Merchant Marine, a global power.

A vicious circle is thus preserved an arms race absolutely meaningless, especially with regard to Greece. The Greek state deeply in debt assumed enormous loads, the benefit of the German war industry, without getting political understanding in Berlin on issues that interest him much. “

The economical effects of such large defence projects, their political and ethical fall outs are merit of a large and details researches.

Hat tip: Nicolas Gros Verheyde of Bruxelles2

For further reading:
You Reap What You Sow
Same Submarine Different Headaches
3 Ex-Ministers May Face Charges Over Papanikolis Deal
Submarine News Around The Region
Finally The End Of An Odyssey: Papanikolis Commissioned
Papanikolis To Be Commissioned At Another Day
Papanikolis To Be Commissioned On 15th October 2010
The Submarine Deals That Helped Sink Greece
Thyssenkrupp Is Selling Hellenic Shipyards
The End Of The Odyssey Of Papanikolis
More On Greek Submarine force
Greek Submarine Force

%d bloggers like this: