From The Archive (11)

USS Thorn in Istanbul, in an undated photo. It must be late 1990’s. She was decommissioned in 2004 and sunk as target in 2006.

New Constructions For Turkish Navy

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This photo show 4 new constructions for Turkish Navy.

The two large rescue ships TCG Işın and TCG Akın, the submarine rescue ship TCG Alemdar and the new LST, TCG Bayraktar can be seen on the above photo. They are in different phases of construction.

TCG Alemdar was first to be launched in May 2014. She was followed by TCG Işın in June 2014 and TCG Akın in September 2014. The first ship supposed to be delivered in 2015 but apparently there has been some delays in the project. These 3 ships are very complex due to the  highly technical and very specialised rescue and salvage equipment they are going to carry. The procurement and implementation of these highly complex devices is in the hands of the shipyard. Since this project is first it’s kind, some unseen problems may be natural.

TCG Bayraktar is the first of the two new landing ships Turkish Navy has ordered. She was launched in October 2015. When finished, she will carry 350 persons, 20 MBT and between 24 – 60 vehicles. The closed parking area is 1100 square meters and the open deck parking area is 690 square meters. After TCG Bayraktar was launched, the construction of the second ship TCG Sancaktar has commenced on the slipway.

 

 

Foreign Warship On Bosphorus in 2016 (Part 15)

This is a double issue as I was not able to update last week.

Russian auxiliary cargo ship Vologda-50 making a northbound passage. She is empty. Photo: Alper Böler.

Russian auxiliary cargo ship Vologda-50 making a northbound passage. She is empty. Photo: Alper Böler.

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Canadian frigate HMCS Frederection leaves the Black Sea. She spend all her 21 days allocated by Montreux Convention in the region. Photo: Alper Böler.

Romanian frigate Regina Maria returning to the Blakc Sea just after 3 days. Photo: Yörük Işık.

Romanian frigate Regina Maria returning to the Black Sea just after 3 days. Photo: Yörük Işık.

Russian landing ship Tsezar Kunikov returning empty from her Syrian deployment. Turkish coast guard and maritimie xsection of Istanbul Police Department is escortnig her as they do to all Russian ships recently.

Russian landing ship Tsezar Kunikov returning empty from her Syrian deployment. Turkish Coast Guard and maritime section of Istanbul Police Department is escorting her, as they do to all Russian ships recently.

Fully loaded, Russian landing ship Minsk mainking a southbound passage through Istanbul Strait. Photo: Yörük Işık.

Fully loaded, Russian landing ship Minsk making a southbound passage through Istanbul Strait. Photo: Yörük Işık.

Romanain frigate Regine Maria making a rare southbound passage through Istanbul. The reason of her deployment is not know.

Romanian frigate Regina Maria making a rare southbound passage through Istanbul. The reason of her deployment is not know.

Russian landing ship Saratov, loaded with trucks is heading to Syria. Photo: Yörük Işık.

Russian landing ship Saratov, loaded with trucks is heading to Syria. Photo: Yörük Işık.

Russian corvette Ze

Russian corvette Zeleny Dol returned to the Black Sea. She was deployed to Syria on 14 February 2016. She was relived by her sister Serpukhov. Photo: Serhat Güvenç.

The list of the foreign warships passed through Istanbul Strait is here.

From The Archive (10)

HMS Cardiff during her visit to Istanbul on 23rd November 1998. Note the added Mk 15 Phalanx CIWS systems installed after The Falkland War. Ironically her final destination was a scrapyard in Turkey in 2005.

From The Archive (9)

The Spanish aircraft carrier ESPS Prince of Asturias in her glory days. This photo is taken during her visit to Istanbul on 11th November 1992. She was decommissioned in 2003.

Foreign Warship On Bosphorus in 2016 (Part 14)

Russian landing ship Tsezar Kunikov and her escort TCSG-93 making a southbound passage through Istanbul.

Russian landing ship Tsezar Kunikov and her escort TCSG-93 making a southbound passage through Istanbul.

Russian auxiliary cargo ship Vologda-50 making a southbound passge through Istanbul. Photo: Yörük Işık.

Russian auxiliary cargo ship Vologda-50 making a southbound passge through Istanbul. Photo: Yörük Işık.

Russian Ropucha class landing ship Alexander Otrakovski returned from her Syrian deploymenyt. Photo: Alper Böler.

Russian Ropucha class landing ship Alexander Otrakovski returned from her Syrian deployment. Photo: Alper Böler.

Ropucha class landing ship Minks returned from her Syrian deployment. Photo: Serhat Güvenç.

Ropucha class landing ship Minks returned from her Syrian deployment. Photo: Serhat Güvenç.

Russian auxiliary cargo ship Divitsa-50 going to Syria. Photo: Alper Böler.

Russian auxiliary cargo ship Divitsa-50 going to Syria. Photo: Alper Böler.

The list of the foreign warships passed through Istanbul Strait is here.

Lest We Forget: TCG Dumlupınar

On 4 April 1953, in the wee hours of the morning two Turkish submarines  TCG Dumlupınar and her sister boat TCG 1. İnönü,entered from the Aegean into the Dardanelles Strait, as the returning from the NATO naval exercise Blue Sea.

The Commodore of First Submarine Squadron was in command of the two submarines and he was on board of TCG Dumlupınar. When the submarine reached the Cape Nara, the narrowest point of the Strait the Swedish flagged cargo ship M/V Naboland collided with the submarine. The accident happened at 02:15 in the morning.

M/V Naboland rammed TCG Dumlupınar from starboard forecastle just aft of the forward diving planes. The submarine rolled to port with force of the impact and sunk immediately. 5 submariners who were in the sail at the time of the collision survived. Rest of the crew, 81 men, were trapped inside her hull. She sunk at the narrowest point of Dardanelles at 85 meters.

22 sailors trapped in the aft torpedo compartment were able to release the submarine’s sunk buoy. The rescuers above the water tried to give hope and moral but time was an enemy. Submarine rescue and salvage ships were rushed from the main naval base in Gölcük after the incident. But all efforts to reach the submarine and rescue the survivors failed cause of very strong water currents and insufficient equipment.

The last words from the submarine, before the currents tore the cable of buoy were: For our country.

Since that fateful day, on every 4th of April we remember those that have a watery grave were no rose will grow.

Port Visits of Turkish Warships During The Weekend

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TCG Salihreis arriving in Varna, Bulgaria. Photo: Nikolay Zlatev.

The Deniz Yıldızı 2016 naval exercise continues in Black Sea. According to Turkish General Staff, 25 warships and submarine plus 11 aircraft and helicopter takes part in the exercise.

As reported earlier, over the weekend the ships conducted port visits in many cities both in country and abroad. Here is the list of the ships and the ports they have visited during the weekend:

Name Type City Country
TCG Karayel Fast attack craft Varna Bulgaria
TCG Kemalreis Frigate Varna Bulgaria
TCG Kilimli Patrol boat Varna Bulgaria
TCG Yavuz Frigate Batumi Georgia
TCG Heybeliada Corvette Constanta Romania
TCG Kılıç Fast attack craft Constanta Romania
TCG Giresun Frigate Constanta Romania
TCG Ayvalık Mine hunter Amasra Turkey
TCG Yüzbaşı İhsan Tulunay Auxiliary İnebolu Turkey
TCG İmbat Fast attack craft İnebolu Turkey
TCG Turgutreis Frigate İnebolu Turkey
TCG Karadeniz Ereğli Patrol boat Kefken Turkey
TCG Akar Auxiliary Samsun Turkey
TCG Tufan Fast attack craft Samsun Turkey
TCG Barbaros Frigate Samsun Turkey
TCG Ertuğrul Landing ship Samsun Turkey
TCG Büyükada Corvette Sinop Turkey
TCG Göksu Frigate Zonguldak Turkey
TCG Bartın Corvette Odessa Ukraine
TCG Salihreis Frigate Odessa Ukraine

Foreign Warship On Bosphorus in 2016 (Part 13)

An empty Ropuch raturnd from Syrian deployment. Tsezar Kunikov making a northbound passage. Photo: Aşkın Eyüboğlu

An empty Ropucha returns from Syrian deployment. Tsezar Kunikov making a northbound passage. Photo: Aşkın Eyüboğlu

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Romanian Border Police vessel MAI-1104 making a southbound deployment probably for a Frontex mission somewhere in the Aegean. Photo: Alper Böler.

The fully loaded Russian landing ship Alexander Otrakovsky, heading to Mediterranean.

The fully loaded Russian landing ship Alexander Otrakovski, heading to Mediterranean.

Canadian frigate Fredericton making a night time northbound passage through Istanbul. Photo: Yörük Işık.

Canadian frigate Fredericton making a night-time northbound passage through Istanbul. Photo: Yörük Işık.

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Serpukhov is heading to Eastern Mediterranean, where her sister Zeleny Dol is also deployed. It is not clear whether Serpukhov is going to replace the other or supplement.

The second Buyan-M class corvette of Russian Black Sea Fleet, Serpukhov, making her southbound passage through Istanbul.

The second Buyan-M class corvette of Russian Black Sea Fleet Serpukhov, making her southbound passage through Istanbul.

Ropucha class landing ship Minsk heading to Syria. Photo: Alper Böler.

Ropucha class landing ship Minsk heading to Syria. Photo: Alper Böler.

The list of the foreign warships passed through Istanbul Strait is here.

Romania Is Set To Modernize Its Frigates

Romanian frigate F-221 Regele Ferdinand on her way to home. Photo: Kerim Bozkurt. Used with permission.

Romanian frigate F-221 Regele Ferdinand on her way to home. A 2012 photo by Kerim Bozkurt.

Romania has officially started the modernization process of her 2 Type-22 frigates on 16 March 2016.

Like Bulgaria, Romania too needed modern, up to date and NATO compatible warships when both countries joined NATO. While Bulgaria opted to buy second hand frigates and mine hunter from Belgium, Romania bought two Type-22 frigates from Great Britain in 2003.

The frigates ROS Regina Maria (ex London) and ROS Regele Ferdinand (ex Coventry) were overhauled in UK before their delivery to Romania. They were transferred armed with only guns and torpedoes The frigates lack long-range offensive weapons and adequate air defence systems. The new contract will allow this deficiencies to be fixed. The vaule of the contract is estimared by Romanian MoD at 839 million Lei, without VAT  aproximatel Euro 190 million.

According to the published information the modernization will be done in Romania. The frigates will be fitted with anti ship missiles, anti air missiles and guns or short range missiles for self protection. And all of these new weapons and sensors will be integrated to the combat information system.

According to a press MapN Wednesday, the procedure for the award of the contract is “restricted procedure”, organized under the Emergency Ordinance no. 114/2011 regarding the award of certain public contracts in the fields of defense and security.

Through this contract, the frigates “King Ferdinand” and “Queen Mary” will be equipped with anti-aircraft missile, rocket antinavă and gun systems and / or missile for missile defense antinavă, and sensors with superior performance (radar, electronooptici and towed sonar). They will be integrated into a computerized system of Fight Management, Modern, which will enable it to perform the full range of specific missions frigates.

Modernization of vessels will be made compulsorily in Romania, as a requirement of security of supply, according to art. 1 para. (1) and art. 50 of GEO. 114/2011, in conjunction with art. 346 par. (1) of the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union it is approved by CSAT memorandum entitled: multiannual program “multipurpose frigate – the second stage of modernization”.

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