First Steel Cut For The New OPV


The first steel is cut for the Turkish Navy offshore patrol vessel Akhisar on 9 April 2022.

The OPV is being developed by Asfat and is based on the Milgem class corvettes. By using the hull of the Milgem class ships the OPV will be built in a shorter time and at a lower cost.

The OPV will have a very different main propulsion system from the Ada class corvettes. These ships will have a combined diesel-electric or diesel engine combination (CODELOD). This combination will give the ships a cruising range of 4500 miles and an economical speed of around 15 knots with very low fuel consumption. The crew will be 104.

According to Asfat these OPVs will be built with the fitted for but not with design philosophy, which will allow the integration of newly developed national weapon and sensor systems.

Aselsan Gökdeniz CIWS System Will Be Tested On Board TCG Sokullu Mehmet Paşa

Today the Rhein class auxiliary ship, TCG Sokullu Mehmet Paşa, left her homeport in Tuzla, İstanbul and headed to the Black Sea.

TCG Sokullu Mehmet Paşa and her sister TCG Cezarli Hasan Paşa have two 100mm gun turrets. The aft turet on board of TCG Sokullu Mehmet Paşa was removed in 2018. She was used as test ship for the Aselsan made close in weapon system Korkut-D in May 2018.

After the completion of these tests, the Korkut-D mount and the associated hardware was removed from the ship.

Today TCG Sokullu Mehmet Paşa was spotted with a new gun system installed. While the whole gun system and the associated radars and other sensors were under wraps the shape of the system is very distinguishable. The system to be tested is the Gökdeniz close-in weapon system.

Gökdeniz consists of one unmanned gun turret with two 35mm guns, an X band 3-D tracking radar and one fire control radar with electro/optical sensors. All subsystems of the Gökdeniz system are recognizable on board.

The gun turret has been remodelled from her initial version making it suitable to be retrofitted in place of the existing CIWS systems on board. The guns can use the ATOM 35mm airburst ammunition developed by ASELSAN. ATOM is a smart ammunition, having a base fuze increasing the effectiveness of the barreled guns. Thus such ammunition is an important option to fight against small and high-speed targets.

The X band tracking radar has a range of 100km. With its phased array, multi-beam antenna the radar can track multiple air targets simultaneously.

The Gökdeniz close-in weapon system will be installed onboard Barbaros class frigates during their mid-life upgrade, İ class frigates and in the future other ships.

Turkish Parliament Extends The Presence Of The Navy In Gulf Of Aden For One Year

On 2nd February 2022, The Grand National Assembly of Turkey, extended the presence of the Turkish Navy in the Gulf of Aden, Arabian Sea, and adjacent seas for one more year.

The first bill allowing the Turkish government to deploy Turkish Naval Forces for anti-piracy operations was accepted on 10 February 2009. It was extended in one year periods ever since.

Turkish warships are  tasked with:

  • Performing reconnaissance and patrol duties,
  • Calling on ships suspected of piracy/ armed robbery, on the radio, boarding them if their flag country approves and interfering by the international law if the ship is not showing any flag,
  • Escorting and protecting merchant ships,
  • Helping merchant ships under the attack of pirates/sea robbers,
  • Intervening, stopping, neutralizing, and confiscating any vessels used by pirates/sea robbers, and using proper force if necessary,
  • Arresting and detaining pirates/sea robbers and armed persons in these vessels,
  • Accepting the representatives of the countries that will prosecute pirates/ armed robbers on board, for the preparations of judicial proceedings, according to the UN resolution 1851.
  • Arresting and detaining, pirates/armed robbers on board until they are being handed over to the countries that will prosecute them,
  • Turning in, the suspects of pirates/sea robbers except for the case that these are Turkish citizens, to the authorities the nation where the pirates/sea robbers will be prosecuted,
  • Executing all kinds of policing duties including interrogation, collecting evidence.

Since 2009, the Turkish Navy took the helm of the multinational anti-piracy task force CTF-151, 6 times and made at least 21 deployments to the region in order to combat piracy.

Converting LHD Anadolu To A Drone Carrier

Prologue: This article was first published in Defence Turkey Magazine Issue 106.

It is not a secret that Turkey intends to operate an aircraft carrier. This desire was made public by President Erdoğan during his speech at the launching ceremony of the frigate TCG Istanbul.

The interest of Turkey to operate airplanes from a large ship with a big flight deck is not new. This is a lesson learned from the big humanitarian assistance operation in Libya. Between 19 February and 4 March 2011, Turkey evacuated 23.127 persons from Libya fleeing from the fighting in the country. 8.351 evacuees were transported by sea. The need for a large amphibious ship with a large flight deck and a dock becomes very apparent during this Non-Combatant Evacuation Operation. During the evacuation, a few times, F-16 fighter planes of the Turkish Air Force had to be flown from Turkey to Libya to provide airpower, an operation requiring multiple in-flight refuelling. Despite all the hardship and the cost of flying land-based F-16 fighters from Turkey to Libya their time on target was not adequate and they were not available on short notice. These operations showed the niceties of having an organic air force for the Turkish Navy.

In 2015 the Turkish defence procurement agency Savunma Sanayi Başkanlığı announced that Spanish Navantia’s solution for a large amphibious assault ship was chosen after a long tendering process. The ship is based on Navatia’s Juan Carlos LHD design and is very similar to SPS Juan Carlos 1 in Spanish and, HMAS Canberra, HMAS Adelaide in RAN service. The construction of the ship named Anadolu started in 2016. When finished Anadolu will be the largest ship in Turkish Navy inventory and the first Turkish naval platform where multiple helicopters can launch and land at once and fixed-winged air vehicles can operate. Anadolu will provide a unique experience and platform for the Turkish Armed Forces.

The ousting of Turkey from the F-35 Lightning II Joint Strike Fighter Program has forced Turkey to change its plans. Turkey was a member of the F-35II Lightning fighter plane program for the start and wished to buy around 100 land-based F-35A versions for the Turkish Air Force. Later it was decided to buy a modest number of vertical and/or short take-off and landing (V/STOL) variant F-35B to be used onboard Anadolu. 6 to 8 planes deployed on board would provide air cover and perform strike missions during amphibious operations. Since the ship was designed to accommodate and operate Harrier in Spanish service it would be F-35 compatible with little changes. However, the ousting of Turkey from the F-35 Lighting II program made all these plans redundant. Necessity is the mother of invention. Thus, alternatives for F-35B are under consideration. There are two realistic options available for the Turkish Government and the Navy. The first is to convert the Anadolu, to accommodate unmanned combat aerial vehicles.

In March 2021 the president of the Savunma Sanayi Başkanlığı, Prof. İsmail Demir told that work was done to deploy unmanned combat aerial vehicles from Anadolu. Both the Sedef shipyard where the ship is constructed and Baykar Makina, one of the leading drone manufacturers, are conducting studies for this end. Selcuk Bayraktar, the CTO of Baykar Makina has announced that they are working on a new unmanned combat aerial vehicle TB-3 which will be able to be operated from Anadolu. The TB-3 is expected to start test flights in 12 months. It will have a maximum take-off weight of 1200 kg and will carry heavier ammunition compared to the contemporary UCAV, Bayraktar TB-2. To withstand the rigours of landing on a noticeably short and constantly moving flight deck the TB-3 will have a reinforced airframe and landing gear. TB-3 is believed to have foldable wings to make it easier to move on the flight deck and inside the hangar.

Currently, it is not clear whether Anadolu can accommodate the future UCAV in her current design or changes are needed. If structural changes are needed, these may further postpone the delivery of the ship. And if any changes are needed the redesigning of the hip will be performed by Sedef Shipyard as Navantia who has developed the original ship design has finished its contractual obligations.

While operating UCAV will be easier and probably safer than operating a manned system never the less it will be a novel concept and will be a unique experience with its own challenges. The Bayraktar TB-3 UCAV will enhance the air to ground mission capabilities. However, air defence and air-to-air operations missions will still need land-based manned fighters or ground-to-air weapons and good sensors on escorting ships.

Another option to deploy planes on board Anadolu is to redesign the Hürjet advanced jet trainer and light attack craft for carrier operations. Hürjet is a single-engine, tandem seat aircraft under development by Turkish Aerospace TAI. During the above-mentioned interview, Mr. İsmail Demir mentioned that discussions between SSB and TAI were held on whether Hürjet can be used on Anadolu. He also told that some design changes were carried out, some simulations were made and it has been concluded that the design can be modified to make Hürjet operate from a ship such as Anadolu. Adapting the ship and Hürjet planes for each other will be more challenging than developing new armed drones for shipborne operations. An important factor to be considered is the shape of the flight deck of Anadolu.

The flight deck of Anadolu is in a rectangular shape with a large island structure on the starboard side and a 12 degree Ski jump at the front. There is a large aircraft elevator at the very aft of the flight deck. In its current form, the flight deck resembles the flight decks of old aircraft carriers from 2. World War. The arrangement was acceptable as long as the planes had a low landing speed and were light although it was not without its hazards. However, when the planes got faster due to jet engines and heavier a rectangular flight deck arrangement was not safe or sufficient to sustain operations. Thus in the early 1950’ies, Royal Navy devised the angled flight deck. In this configuration, the flight deck has an angle of 6 degrees. This allowed the landing plane to roll away from the planes on the catapult waiting for launching. Ever since all modern aircraft carriers of all nations -with the exception of carriers specially designed for the Harrier S/VTOL planes- have an angled flight deck.

Anadolu does not have an angled flight deck. Thus, in her current form, she is only suitable for planes that can launch using a ski jump and land vertically or land in a very short distance. If Hürjet planes are to be configured to be used onboard Anadolu these planes need to be resigned radically. This will cost time and money. And the end result may not be satisfactory as it is very risky engineering work. A more realistic approach would be while modifying Hürjet for naval operations to design a new ship with a suitable launch and recover facilities that are suitable for navalised Hürjet. From an engineering point of view, this scenario is far more likely to be successful. But then again it will cost time and money and the planes will not be compatible with Anadolu.

Of course, one can always suggest buying a second-hand ship as an alternative. However, I believe that this road is a dead-end though Turkey has been looking for this option. Even when the construction of Anadolu was progressing, in 2017, Turkey showed interest in the ex-Royal Navy helicopter carrier HMS Ocean when she was decommissioned from Royal Navy service. The ship was not new and had extensive service in Royal Navy but never less someone thought the purchase of HMS Ocean would have increased the strength of the amphibious capabilities Turkish Navy and added new capabilities.

Head of Bahçeşehir University, Maritime and Global Strategies Center, Retired admiral Cihat Yaycı, told in March 2021 that the Turkish Navy should convert the decommissioned aircraft carrier ex Foch, ex São Paulo back to active service. The ship was bought by a Turkish scrapyard in March 2021 and will be towed from Brazil to Turkey. The ship started her life as French aircraft carrier Foch in 1963 and served in French Naval Forces until 2000. After years of arduous service under the French flag, she was sold to the Brazilian Naval Forces and renamed as NAe São Paulo. This old lady served 20 years in Brazil. After a major fire killing 3 crew members, the ship was extensively overhauled between 2005 and 2010. São Paulo was expected to rejoin the fleet in late 2013 but suffered another major fire in 2012. As of September 2016, she continued to undergo repairs, the commander of the Brazilian Navy, Admiral Eduardo Leal Ferreira, said plans were in place to renew the carrier’s propulsion system. The ship’s catapult was also reported to have problems.

Mr. Yaycı believes that the Turkish Navy should acquire the ship. After refurbishing her back into working condition, the ship can be used for training and system familiarization purposes.

The old French carrier operates like US Navy carriers catapult to launch airplane and arrester wires to slow landing planes. Neither Turkish Naval Aviation nor Turkish Air Force operates airplanes that are suitable for operations from a carrier and Turkey’s prospects to obtain such planes from abroad seems to be almost nonexistent. The idea of refurbishing this old and worn-out ship back to active service is absurd time consuming and very costly. Time and money are two luxuries Turkey cannot afford to misspend. Warships like any ship is a living system consisting of their crew, her equipment, systems and subsystems on board. Learning of the working of an organism is best done when one observes a living one and to through autopsies. Thus, posting Turkish naval officers as liaisons on board the aircraft carriers of our NATO partners is a better way of learning about the multiple aspects of operations onboard rather than dissecting the cadavers of decommissioned aircraft carriers sent to break yards in Aliağa.

Epilogue: During an interview in December 2021, Mr. İsmail Demir told the reporters that the primary aim was to commission the Anadolu into the Turkish Navy in her original design. When the carrier-borne drone TB-3 is materialised, the adaptation of these unmanned planes into the ship will be revised.

Submarine Search And Rescue Exercise Dynamic Monarch/Kurtaran Has Ended

Italian submarine ITS Todaro, Turkish submarine TCG Çanakkale and rescue and towing ship TCG Akın are among the participants of the submarine rescue exercise Dynamic Monarch/Kurtaran 21.

Dynamic Monarch/Kurtaran 2021, the 11th in a series of NATO sponsored live Submarine Escape and Rescue (SMER) exercises was held 12 to 24 September in the Eastern Mediterranean Sea, off the coast of Aksaz, Turkey.

I think that the scenarios applied in this year’s Dynamic Monarc/Kurtaran exercise are very similar to the scenarios in Kurtaran 2019 exercise held 2 years ago at the same location. You can read my notes on the exercise two years ago here: Kurtaran 2019 Submarine Rescue Exercise

The International Submarine Escape and Rescue Liaison Office (ISMERLO) ran Dynamic Monarch exercise, tied to the annual Turkish Navy exercise Kurtaran and hosted by the Turkish Navy.

Assets and personnel from Italy, Turkey together with personnel from Canada, Greece and Spain, United Kingdom and the United States also took part in the submarine escape and rescue training scenarios. Qatar, Bangladesh, Pakistan, and Indonesia were present as the observers.

Serial Production Line Qualification Test Of Atmaca Missile

Turkish Navy conducted another live firing of Atmaca anti-ship missile on 18th June 2021.

The test was conducted again at the live-fire exercise area off the coast of the Black Sea town Sinop. The last of the Ada class corvettes, TCG Kınalıada had the honour to do testing. At the receiving end of the missile was this time not a target barge but decommissioned salvage and submarine rescue ship Işın.

The missile used was, assumed to be the first missile from the serial production line. Here are some screen captures from the videos published from the test.


This photo shows Atmaca right before impacting the target ship. The missile is capable of flying very low, making it difficult to differentiate from clutter and engage.

The missile hit the target amidships in the area marked in red. The hole is just above the water level.

The initial videos shared from the test ended when the missile hit the ex Işın, leaving enthusiasts wondering about the size and location of the damage. However, videos showing the damage submerged shortly after.

There is even a video showing the damage the missile has created inside ex Işın. This means that the ship did not sink immediately after the impact. There was enough time for some to go onboard and survey the damage from inside. That is reasonable as ironically it is more difficult to sink an empty ship than one in active service. The striped down hulls have nothing on them. No fuel, no ammunition no warheads or any incendiary material which may create secondary explosions and spread the fire.

When the serial production starts the Atmaca missile will replace the Boenig Harpoon missiles on Turkish warships probably on a one-to-one basis. This will need some changes in combat management systems to incorporate the new missile into existing software. The Ada class corvettes are the most likely candidates as the Genesis CMS is made by Havelsan. Thus this CMS is the easiest one to add the Atmaca. The next ships equipped with Atmaca might be the Barbaros class frigates that will receive the mid-life upgrade program or the Istanbul class frigates whichever comes first. Both classes of ships will again locally developed CMS making it very easy to add the new missile.

Ever since the long-range anti-ship missiles replaced the guns as the main offensive weapons, having total control and command on every aspect of this weapon has become vitally important for the war-fighter. By replacing the foreign missiles with local ones Turkish Navy will be able to trust that its punch will find its mark.

TCG Çanakkale Arrived In Durrës

TCG Çanakkale arriving in Durrës. Photo: Durrës Port Authority

The Turkish submarine TCG Çanakkale is making a 3 day port visit in Durrës, Albania.

The submarine took part in NATO exercise Dynamic Manta 21 and was returning home.

Turkish warship, especially submarines regularly visit Durrës.

As far as I know, the following Turkish naval units were in Durrës:

Responding To Forest Fires, From The Sea…

One Turkish LCT, transporting fire fighting trucks of the Regional Forestry Directorate.

The Turkish Navy Conducted an operation to support Muğla Regional Directorate of Forestry.

On 4 March 2021, A forest fire was reported on a small bay near Aksaz Naval Base. The area was not accessible by road. Thus three LCT’s TCG Ç-149, TCG Ç-157 and, TCG Ç-321 was loaded with the fire fighting trucks of the Muğla Regional Directorate of Forestry and immediately dispatched to the region by sea. route

Furthermore, patrol boat TCG Kaş and the tug TCG Özgen took 45 personnel to the area to fight the fire. UAV’s of the Turkish Navy supported the firefighting efforts by providing uninterrupted aerial views. The fire was brought under control by the morning of the next day.

This small operation has shown some important aspects of naval warfare, such as:

  • Force projection
  • Supporting land-based operations
  • Providing command and control surveillance capability

The icing on the cake: A Turkish Navy UAV providing surveillance against the forest fire

 

 

TCG Istanbul Launched

TCG Istanbul during the launching ceremony. Photo: Turkish MoD.

The first İstif class frigate TCG Istanbul was launched on 23 January 2021 at the Istanbul Naval Shipyard.

The first TCG Istanbul was ex USS Clarence K. After 35 years finally, there will be another TCG Istanbul. TCG Istanbul is the first ship of a class of four. The other ships will be named İzmir, İzmit, and İçel and all will be known as the Istif class. According to Commander of Turkish General Staff, General Yaşar Güler, the remaining three ships are planned to be completed by 2027.  The Istif class ships will replace the four Yavuz MEKO 200 class ships nearing the end of their usefulness.

The frigate has an overall length of 113,2 meters and a width of 14,40 meters. The frigates of Istif class will be multi-role warships. The ship’s main offensive weapons will be 16 Atmaca anti-ship missiles. While the details of the final configuration of the air defence missiles have not been disclosed, these frigates will have a locally designed vertical missiles launcher. TCG Istanbul will be fitted with a 76mm main gun and a 35mm Gökdeniz close-in weapon system.

The calculated range of TCG Istanbul at economical speed is 5700 nautical miles. The ship has one LM2500 gas turbine and two diesel engines as the main machinery propelling the frigate up to 26 knots. The design of the frigate is based on the Ada class corvettes. The superstructure of the frigate is also very similar to the corvette with the exception of the mainmast.

The mast on Istif class is higher and has space for different electronics. The Istif class frigates will carry one 3D search radar, probably Smart-S Mk2, two AKR-D fire control radars, and one LPI navigation radar. For electronic reconnaissance and warfare, the frigates will have ARES 2N ESM and AREAS-2N ECM systems.  Piri IRST system will provide infra-red search and tracking on board.

Nusret 2020 Mine Warfare Exercise

While searching for the training mine Spanish mine hunter ESPS Duero found this old English mine from World War 1.

Nusret 2020 mine countermeasures exercise will end tomorrow.

Nusret is an annual invitation exercise focusing on mine warfare. The exercise is named after the famous minelayer Nusret. In even years the exercise is held in İzmir Bay and in odd years it is held in Çanakkale and Saros Bay.

The aim of the exercise is to enhance cooperation and interoperability between Turkey and allied and friendly nations navies.

This year NATO Standing NATO Mine Countermeasures Group Two (SNMCMG2), Romanian mine hunter hydrographic research vessel Cătuneanu, 2 EOD teams from Romania and the USA took part in the exercise along with one command and control ship, one corvette, one patrol boat, 6 mine hunters, one helicopter, one EOD team, one UAV team and one photography team from Turkish Navy, two boats from Turkish Coast Guard, two sorties of F-16 fighter jets, one C-130 airplane from Turkish Air Forces.

The first phase included force integration and harbor training. During the second phase, a command post-exercise was held and mine-laying operations from airborne and seaborne platforms were conducted. In the third phase, the laid training mines were detected by the participating units. Later the mines were identified and neutralized by mine clearance divers or remotely operated vehicles. Autonomous underwater vehicles were deployed for detection and identification. While conducting mine countermeasures operations the minehunters had to defend themselves against the threat of the asymmetrical surface vessels and air attacks. 

The below is the list of the participating warships:

Number Name Type Nationality Fleet
M-645 FS Orion Minehunter France SNMCMG-2
5556 ITS Alghero Minehunter Italy SNMCMG-2
M-35 ESPS Duero Minehunter Spain SNMCMG-2
M-261 TCG Edremit Minehunter Turkey SNMCMG-2
32 BNS Tsibar Minehunter Bulgaria  
274 ROS Vice Admiral Constantin Balescu Minesweeper Romania  
M-260 TCG Edincik Minehunter Turkey  
M-26 TCG Erdek Minehunter Turkey  
M-264 TCG Erdemli Minehunter Turkey  
M-267 TCG Ayvalık Minehunter Turkey  
M-268 TCG Akçakoca Minehunter Turkey  
M-270 TCG Akçay Minehunter Turkey  
L-403 TCG Sancaktar Landing ship Turkey  
F-242 TCG Turgutreis Frigate Turkey  
P-1200 TCG Tuzla Patrol boat Turkey  

For Further Reading:

Nusret 2019
Nusret 2018
Nusret 2017
Nusret 2016
Nusret 2015
Nusret 2014
Nusret 2013
Nusret 2012
Nusret 2011
Nusret 2010
Nusret 2009

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