Foreign Warship On Bosphorus in 2017 (Part 11)

Here are photos of foreign warships, that have passed through Bosphorus, during the last week:

Ropucha Class landing ship Yamal started her 3. Syrian deployment in 2017. Photo: Yörük Işık.

Russian Alligator class landing ship Nikolai Filchenkov returned from her Syrian deployment. Photo: Alper Böler.

Russian Natya class mine sweeper Valentin Pikul deployed to Mediterranean.

Romanian mine sweeper Sublieutenant Alexandru Axente joined SNMCMG-2 in Black Sea. She made her southbound passage through Istanbul Strait with the rest of the task force.

Turkish contribution to SNMCMG-2, TCG Alanya making her southbound passage through Istanbul.

German Frankenthal class mine hunter FGS Rottweil passed through Istanbul Strait, before docking for a port visit.

Spanish mine hunter ESPS Duero southbound on Bosphorus.

The flagship of SNMCMG-2, ORP Kontradmiral Xawery Czernicki lead the task force as it sailed southbound through Istanbul.

Harpers Ferry class docked landing ship USS Carter Hall left the region after completion of exercise Spring Storm 2017 in Romania.

The list of the foreign warships passed through Istanbul Strait is here.

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The First And Final Passage Of Ex USS Duncan Through Bosphorus

3 navy tugs are pulling the hull of ex USS Duncan against the current towards Black Sea. Just a shell of the former frigate is left.

The effects of cannibalization can be better seen in this photo.

Perry class frigate USS Duncan was the first ship of this class to be decommissioned active service. She was striken from US Navy service on 5 January 1998. In May 1999 she was sold to Turkish Navy. She has never entered in to service therefore she doesn’t have a Turkish name. She was used as spare part source, to keep other ship working. This practice is lovingly called cannibalization. And you can see the effects of it on the hull of USS Duncan in above photos.

TCG İnebolu, TCG Özgür and TCG Darıca, three Turkish Navy tugs, towed the hull of ex USS Duncan through Istanbul northbound, on 22 March 2017. Since there are no scrap yards along the Black Sea coast of Turkey, this journey is not going to end at one scrapyard.

The markings on the hull of the former frigate are consistent with a live firing test. A few days after the passage of ex USS Duncan it was announced that she was going to be used as a target during the Deniz Yıldızı annual naval exercise.

Standing NATO Mine Counter Measures Group Two In Istanbul

The Standing NATO Mine Counter Measures Group Two arrived in Istanbul on 24 March 2017. The task group had made her northbound passage through the city 20 days before.

During this 20 days the task force first took part in Poseidon 2017. The mine warfare exercise was held between 5 and 15 March 2017.

After the completion of the exercise the task force sailed to Odessa, Ukraine. There the ship were open to public and received thousands of visitors during their stay there.

One day short of their allowance by the Montreux Convention the Task force sailed southbound through Istanbul Strait and docked in Istanbul port for a well-earned post visit.

18 March 2017 Naval Parade

On 18th March 2017, to commemorate the Turkish Victory over the Allied Armada 102 years ago a naval parade was held in Çanakkale.

10 ships two Ada class corvettes, 6 fast attack craft and 2 patrol boats took part in this years parade which was followed by a beautiful show of Turkish Air Force’s air demonstration team Turkish Stars.

The ships arrived in three rows. The east row was made of TCG Tufan, TCG Zıpkın and TCG Yıldız. The main row consisted of TCG Büyükada, TCG Heybeliada, TCG Türkeli and TCG Karabiga, all locally made warships. The west row had TCG Kılıç, TCG Mızrak and TCG Martı.

 

Turkish Navy fleet approaches the Çanakkale Martyrs’ Memorial, the largest Turkish military graveyard in the area.

TCG Büyükada was the lead ship.

TCG Heybeliada was following TCG Büyükada.

TCG Kılıç

TCG Mızrak

TCG Tufan

TCG Zıpkın

TCG Martı

TCG Türkeli

TCG Yıldız with TCG Karabiga in foreground.

The parade fleet as it was exiting Çanakkale Strait.

The show of Turkish Stars was breath-taking even for a ship spotter.

Click here for previous naval parades.

Foreign Warship On Bosphorus in 2017 (Part 10)

Here are photos of foreign warships, that have passed through Bosphorus, during the last week:

Whidbey Island/Harpers Ferry class dock landing ship LSD-50 USS Carter Hill made a northbound passage through Istanbul. She was heading to Romania.

A rare visitor to this region, French warship F-710 FS La Fayette passed northbound through Istanbul as she sailed to Varna. Photo: Kerim Bozkurt.

Russian Ropucha class large landing ship Korolev started her 4th deployment to Syria in 2017. Photo: Alper Böler.

After the completion of the mine warfare exercise Poseidon 2017, the Greek ship HS Evropi returned home, while other participants sailed to Odessa.

Russian Alligator class landing ship Nikolai Filchenkov made yet another southbound passage through Istanbul. Photo: Yörük Işık.

The list of the foreign warships passed through Istanbul Strait is here.

Where An Epoch Lies

Nusret

“Stop wayfarer! Unbeknownst to you this ground, You come and tread on, is where an epoch lies.”

18 March 1915 must have been an unforgettable day for a ship spotter.

A mighty Allied fleet consisting of HMS Queen Elizabeth, HMS Agamemnon, HMS Lord Nelson, HMS Inflexible, HMS Prince George, HMS Triump, HMS Ocean, HMS Majestic, HMS Swiftsure, HMS Vengeance, HMS Irresistible, HMS Albion from Royal Navy, Gaulois, Charlemange, Bouvet, Suffren from French Navy were ready to fight the forts protecting Dardanelles.

The Royal Navy and French warships tried to force their way through the Dardanelles to affect the capture of Istanbul then capital of Ottoman Empire. This, it was hoped, would take Turkey out of the war and enable the Allies to shore up the Russian war effort on the Eastern Front, so relieving pressure on the Western Front.

Most of the ships of the Allied Fleet were old or made nearly obsolete with the fast advance of the new ships of the Dreadnought area. The first class capital ships were kept at home to protect it.

Nevertheless it was a fine and powerful Fleet and an epoch changing fight.

Everything seem to be on the side of the Allied naval forces until at around 14.00 on March 18, when a small cloud of yellowish smoke, which turned black afterwards, came out of the starboard quarter of the French warship Bouvet. The old battleship had struck one of the mines laid ten days earlier by small Ottoman minelayer Nusret. Bouvet sank in a matter of minutes. After a very short time, HMS Inflexible and shortly later HMS Irresistible also struck mines planted by Nusret.

Of the 18 capital ships that sailed in the Dardanelles that morning HMS Ocean, HMS Irresistible and Bouvet never returned. HMS Inflexible and Gaulois had to be beached at the nearby island of Tenedos, in order for their men to be rescued. Suffren was heavily damaged by Turkish guns and later had to be docked at Malta for intensive repairs.

The failure of the naval forces forced the Allies to land troops on the Gallipoli Peninsula to capture it and so remove the lethal gun barriers. It led bloody trench warfare and many thousands of dead on both sides.

As it dissipated over the waters the words of a famous Turkish poem that honors then sacrifice of the Gallipoli Campaign and its role in establishing nationhood rang through the minds of many who were there. One verse in particular seems to perfectly express Remembrance and the epic nature of the events experience by all nations who fought at Gallipoli, but especially the Turkish people:

‘Stop wayfarer! Unbeknownst to you this ground
You come and tread on, is where an epoch lies;
Bend down and lend your ear, for this silent mound
Is the place where the heart of a nation sighs.’

The Participants In Dynamic Manta 2017

The participants to Dynamic Manta 2017 ASW exercise. Click to enlarge.  Photo: NATO Allied Maritime Command

NATO Allied Maritime Command posted photos of the participants to Dynamic Manta 2017 anti submarine warfare exercise at Flicker.

It was announced that, 6 submarines and 10 surface ships were going to take part in this war game. The above photo shows all the submarines and most of the surface units.

The absence of Turkish frigate TCG Giresun from the group photos is noteworthy. It is also remarkable, the addition of Italian tanker ITS Etna, since Italian Navy has not announced this earlier.

Is ITS Etna is substituting for another ship, perhaps for the missing Royal Navy ship or was she photobombing the PHOTEX?

Nr of Photo Number Name Type Country
1 78 USS Porter Destroyer USA
2 D-560 ITS Luigi Durand De La Penne Destroyer Italy
3 781 USS California Submarine USA
4 F-459 HS Adrias Frigate Greece
5 D-642 FS Montcalm Destroyer France
6 A-14 ESPS Patiño Tanker Spain
7 S-120 HS Papanikolis Submarine Greece
8 S-360 TCG 1. İnönü Submarine Turkey
9 S-80 ESPS Mistral Submarine Spain
10 A-5326 ITS Etna Tanker Italy
11 340 HMCS St. John’s Frigate Canada
12 F-82 ESPS Victoria Frigate Spain
13 Ruby class Submarine France
14 S-528 ITS Pietro Venuti Submarine Italy
15 F-104 ESPS Méndez Núñez Frigate Spain
F-491 TCG Giresun Frigate Turkey

Dynamic Manta 2017 Started In Italy

TCG 1. İnönü in Catania port. Photo: NATO MARCOM

NATO’s Submarine Warfare Exercise Dynamic Manta 2017 began today off the Sicilian coast, with ships, submarines, aircraft and personnel from 10 Allied nations.

According to NATO press release submarines from France, Greece, Italy, Spain, Turkey, and the United States, under the control of Commander, Submarines NATO (COMSUBNATO), will join 10 surface ships from Canada, France, Greece, Italy, Spain, Turkey and the United States.

Nine Maritime Patrol Aircraft and three shore based helicopters from Canada, France, Germany, Italy, Norway, Spain, Turkey, United Kingdom and the United States will operate from Sigonella Air Base under the control of Commander, Maritime Air NATO (COMMARAIRNATO).

The aim of this exercise is to provide all participants with complex and challenging warfare training to enhance their interoperability and proficiency in anti-submarine and anti-surface warfare skills, with due regard for safety.

Below is the list of the participant as best as I could find on internet. Additions and corrections are welcomed.

Number Name Type Country
340 HMCS St. John’s Frigate Canada
D-642 FS Montcalm Destroyer France
Submarine France
F-459 HS Adrias Frigate Greece
S-120 HS Papanikolis Submarine Greece
D-560 ITS Luigi Durand De La Penne Destroyer Italy
S-528 ITS Pietro Venuti Submarine Italy
A-14 ESPS Patiño Tanker Spain
F-104 ESPS Méndez Núñez Frigate Spain
F-82 ESPS Victoria Frigate Spain
S-80 ESPS Mistral Submarine Spain
F-491 TCG Giresun Frigate Turkey
S-360 TCG 1. İnönü Submarine Turkey
781 USS California Submarine USA
 78 USS Porter Destroyer USA

Foreign Warship On Bosphorus in 2017 (Part 9)

Here are photos of foreign warships, that have passed through Bosphorus, during the last week:

Russian Ropucha class large landing ship Yamal, escorted by Turkish coast guard vessels TCSG-303 and TCSG-4306 returns from her Syrian deployment.

Russian auxiliary cargo ship Dvinitsa-50 followed Yamal and passed northbound through Istanbul a few minutes after the landing ship.

The list of the foreign warships passed through Istanbul Strait is here.

Armoured Amphibious Attack Vehicles For TCG Anadolu Has Been Ordered

A digital rendering of the future Turkish AAAV by FNNS.

On 7 March 2017, a contract was signed between defence acquisition agency Undersecreteriat For Defence industries (UDI) and FNSS a joint venture between Turkey’s Nurol Holding and BAE Systems, to design and build 27 armoured amphibious attack vehicles.

These AAAV’s will be deployed on board of the future multipurpose amphibious assault ship TCG Anadolu. The break down of the order is 23 amphibious armored assault vehicles, 2 amphibious assault command vehicle and 2 amphibious assault rescue vehicles.

Technical specifications of the AAAV’s has not been disclosed yet. But since BAE Systems, the manufacturer of the AAV7A1 of USMC, is part of FNSS, I would not be surprised if the Turkish AAAV’s have similar performance and appearance as their US cousins.

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