TCG Büyükada Joins Operation Ocean Shield

TCG Büyükada in Indian Ocean. Photo: NATO.

NATO’s Maritime Command reported that on 6 February 2015, the Ada class corvette TCG Büyükada has joined the Operation Ocean Shield.

The ship will conduct regular counter piracy patrols in Gulf of Aden and Indian Ocean and provide support to NATO’s regional capacity building efforts in order to enhance interoperability and cooperation between the nations in the area. The ship will also conduct training with several counter-piracy naval forces operating in the Indian Ocean.

“We are very pleased by Turkish Navy’s continued support to counter piracy efforts and its firm commitment to international maritime security,” said Commander NATO Allied Maritime Command, Vice Admiral Peter Hudson. “Though the number of piracy attacks has significantly declined, piracy at sea has not been eliminated, so vigilance by the international community remains necessary.”

As reported earlier, TCG Büyükada is on a 87 day deployment to the Indian Ocean.

The corvette is expected to arrive back in Turkey on 15 April 2015.

Foreign Warship On Bosphorus 2015 (Part 7)

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Russian Krivak class frigate Ladny making her south bound passage through Bosphorus. Photo: Kerim Bozkurt. Used with permission.

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Russian Krivak class frigate Ladny making her southbound passage through Bosphorus. Photo: Yörük Işık. Used with permission.

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Russian Krivak class frigate Ladny making her southbound passage through Bosphorus. Photo: Yörük Işık. Used with permission.

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Russian Ropucha class landing ship Alexander Shabalin heading to the Mediterranean. Photo: Kubilay Yıldırım. Used with permission.

 

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Russian Ropucha class landing ship Alexander Shabalin heading to the Mediterranean. Photo: Işık Yıldırım. Used with permission.

 

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US Navy Arleigh Burke class destroyer USS Cole making her northbound passage through Bosphorus. Photo: Kerim Bozkurt. Used with permission.

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US Navy Arleigh Burke class destroyer USS Cole making her northbound passage through Bosphorus. Photo: Alper Böler. Used with permission.

 

The Russian Krivak class frigate Ladny which was supposed to sail on 26 January 2015, made her southbound passage on 7 February 2015. This her first deployment after her overhaul.  Two Ropucha class large landing ships Yamal and Alexander Shablin, passed through Bosphorus later on the same day.

On 8 February 2015 the US Navy destroyer USS Cole made her first Black Sea deployment in 2015.

Date Number Name Direction Nationality
8.2.2015 67 USS Cole Northbound Russia
7.2.2015 801 Ladny Southbound Russia
7.2.2015 156 Yamal Southbound Russia
7.2.2015 110 Alexander Shabalin Southbound Russia
5.2.2015 031 Aleksandr Otrakovski Southbound Russia
5.2.2015 150 Saratov Southbound Russia
21.1.2015  156 Yamal Northbound Russia
21.1.2015 110 Alexander Shabalin Northbound Russia
21.1.2015 PM-56 PM-56 Northbound Russia
19.1.2015 Shaktar Northbound Russia
19.1.2015 KIL-158 Northbound Russia
19.1.2015 150 Saratov Northbound Russia
17.1.2015 131 Moskva Northbound Russia
14.1.2015 75 USS Donald Cook Southbound USA
13.1.2015 031 Aleksandr Otrakovski Northbound Russia
11.1.2015 PM-138 PM-138 Southbound Russia
10.1.2015 156 Yamal Southbound Russia
10.1.2015 110 Alexander Shabalin Southbound Russia
5.1.2015 150 Saratov Southbound Russia
5.1.2015 KIL-158 Southbound Russia

I have archived the list of the Russian warship movements in 2013 and the list of foreign warship movements in 2014.

Foreign Warship On Bosphorus 2015 (Part 6)

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Russian Ropucha class landing ship Aleksandr Otrakovski is heading to the Mediterranean. Photo: Alper Böler. Used with permission.

 

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Russian Alligator class landing ship Saratov is heading to the Mediterranean. Photo: Alper Böler. Used with permission.

 

Date Number Name Direction Nationality
5.2.2015 031 Aleksandr Otrakovski Southbound Russia
5.2.2015 150 Saratov Southbound Russia
21.1.2015  156 Yamal Northbound Russia
21.1.2015 110 Alexander Shabalin Northbound Russia
21.1.2015 PM-56 PM-56 Northbound Russia
19.1.2015 Shaktar Northbound Russia
19.1.2015 KIL-158 Northbound Russia
19.1.2015 150 Saratov Northbound Russia
17.1.2015 131 Moskva Northbound Russia
14.1.2015 75 USS Donald Cook Southbound USA
13.1.2015 031 Aleksandr Otrakovski Northbound Russia
11.1.2015 PM-138 PM-138 Southbound Russia
10.1.2015 156 Yamal Southbound Russia
10.1.2015 110 Alexander Shabalin Southbound Russia
5.1.2015 150 Saratov Southbound Russia
5.1.2015 KIL-158 Southbound Russia

I have archived the list of the Russian warship movements in 2013 and the list of foreign warship movements in 2014.

Will TKMS Pay Penalty For the Delays In Reis Class Construction Project?

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This presentation by TKMS shows the local Turkish content in the upcoming Type214TN submarines. which is substantial compared to the previous submarine construction projects.

The German newspaper Handelsblatt run a story about the penalty to be paid by German submarine constructor Thyssen Krupp Marine Systems (TKMS) to Turkey. The reason for this payment is the delay in, construction of 6 Type 214 TN submarines Turkey as agreed to buy From TKMS in 2009.

On 2 July 2009, a contract was signed between Turkey and Howaldtswerke-Deutsche Werft GmbH (HDW), Kiel, a company of TKMS, and MarineForce International LLP (MFI), London, for the delivery of six material packages for the construction of Class 214 submarines which are now called as the Reis class.

The value of the contract is estimated as 2,5 billion €. There is %80 offset agreement. The submarines will be built in Gölcük Naval Shipyard where 11 submarines of Type 209, were previously built. According to the original contract terms the construction was to start in 2011, and the first sub delivered in 2015.

The reasons for the delay of the construction is both technical and commercial.

The technical delay is related to the much reported to the stability problems the Type 214 submarines experienced. The stability problem was one of the main reasons why Greek Navy refused to accept its first Type 214 HS Papanikolis years ago in the first place. The solution to the stability problem by TKMS was to add weights to certain places in the submarine in order to create a stability. But Turkish Navy was not satisfied with this come up with its own solution where the center of gravity of the submarine was relocated,by adding extending the length of the submarine. The solution has to be validated by TKMS and this is one of the delay in the project. This also means that Turkish Navy is working seriously in submarine design and problems associated with it.  In the end Turkish Type 214 submarines will be a few meters longer than the other nations Type 214 submarines.

The Type 214 construction project is the last project where Turkish Navy will construct a submarine to a foreign design and subsystems. It is not a secret that the next submarines constructed by Turkish Navy will be local design with most of the critical components ans sub systems produced with local input. It is not surprising to see the large Turkish industrial participation in the Type 214 project as this project is regarded as preparation phase for the Milli Denizaltı  (Milden). Milli Denizaltı means National Submarine in Turkish. So it is understandable for the Germans to drag their feet in the Type 214 project especially when they know that this is the last of its kind.

A New Missile For Turkish Naval Helicopters (Part 2)

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Above: TCG Ödev tows the target. Below: the point of impact and the damage to the target.

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The firing of the missile.

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The test bed: Turkish S-70 B2 helicopter with the tail number TCB-66.

 

Last week I had reported about the this photo of a Turkish S-70 B2 Sea Hawk helicopter firing a missile.

Thanks to the comment of my reader Frankie I have now more information strait from the in house magazine of Roketsan.

According to the magazine the test was conducted on 16 September 2014, from the helicopter TCB-66 which was modified for this test. The modifications included a firing control panel inside the cockpit, the special designed power and data cabling for the communication between the missile and the helicopter and finally a missile launcher that fits to the helicopter.

The missile it self is a laser guided UMTAS. It is a beam rider that means the missile follows a the reflection of a laser beam pointed to the target. The source of this beam can the the launching aircraft, a ground based forward observer or another aircraft. The missile has be locked-on before the launch or lock-on after the launch modes.

During the test the launching platform (TCB-66) was the laser designator. The height of the helicopter was 200 meters over the sea level and the target was 4000 meters away, towed the Turkish Navy tug TCG Ödev.

Roketsan states the maximum range of the L-UMTAS as 8000 meters. Turkish Navy is the only operator of the Hellfire missile family in Turkey. As is the missile is very similar in performance to the Hellfire missiles used by Turkish Navy thus L-UMTAS offers a local replacement for the Hellfire missiles.

Foreign Warship On Bosphorus 2015 (Part 5)

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Russian Amur class repair ship PM-56 returns from her deployment in Tartus, Syria. Photo: Alper Böler. Used with permission.

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Russian Ropucha class landing ship Alexander Shabalin returns from her deployment in Syria. Photo: Alper Böler. Used with permission.

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Russian Ropucha class landing ship Yamal returns from her deployment in Syria. Photo: Alper Böler. Used with permission.

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Russian Amur class repair ship PM-56 returns from her deployment in Tartus, Syria. Photo: Yörük Işık. Used with permission.

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Russian Ropucha class landing ship Alexander Shabalin returns from her deployment in Syria. Photo: Yörük Işık. Used with permission.

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Russian Ropucha class landing ship Yamal returns from her deployment in Syria. Photo: Yörük Işık. Used with permission.

 

Date Number Name Direction Nationality
21.1.2015  156 Yamal Northbound Russia
21.1.2015 110 Alexander Shabalin Northbound Russia
21.1.2015 PM-56 PM-56 Northbound Russia
19.1.2015 Shaktar Northbound Russia
19.1.2015 KIL-158 Northbound Russia
19.1.2015 150 Saratov Northbound Russia
17.1.2015 131 Moskva Northbound Russia
14.1.2015 75 USS Donald Cook Southbound USA
13.1.2015 031 Aleksandr Otrakovski Northbound Russia
11.1.2015 PM-138 PM-138 Southbound Russia
10.1.2015 156 Yamal Southbound Russia
10.1.2015 110 Alexander Shabalin Southbound Russia
5.1.2015 150 Saratov Southbound Russia
5.1.2015 KIL-158 Southbound Russia

I have archived the list of the Russian warship movements in 2013 and the list of foreign warship movements in 2014.

A New Missile For Turkish Naval Helicopters

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This is a photo of a Turkish S-72B Sea Hawk helicopter firing a missile. There are many things, one can say about this photo.

The special 100th Anniversary Logo of the Turkish Naval Aviation is painted on the side of the fuselage dates the photo to 2014.

The usual missile armament of Turkish Navy helicopter are Penguin Mk2 and AGM-114K Hellfire II missiles. The bright red color of the missile indicates that it is not a serial production unit. Thus this must be a photo of a test firing of a missile in development for Turkish Navy helicopters.

There are some speculative information on Turkish websites that this missile might the a naval version of the Mızrak long-range anti tank missile developed by Roketsan.

If this photo turns out indeed to be a test firing of a navalized version of Mızrak, then the missile may have an Imaging Infra-Red (IIR) seeker  and a range longer than 15 km. These features will enable to helicopter to stay out of the range of SAM missiles her target may be carrying.

 

Foreign Warship On Bosphorus 2015 (Part 4)

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Russian Slava class cruiser Mosvka returning to the Black Sea after a 136 day deployment. Photo: Yörük Işık. Used with permission.

 

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Russian Alligator class cruiser landing ship Saratov making her northbound passage through the Bosphorus. Photo: Yörük Işık. Used with permission.

 

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Russian Kashtan class buoy tender KIL-158 passing through the Bosphorus. Photo: Kerim Bozkurt. Used with permission.

 

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Russian Kashtan class buoy tender KIL-158 passing through the Bosphorus. Photo: Yörük Işık. Used with permission.

 

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Salvage tug Shakter passing through the Bosphorus. Photo: Yörük Işık. Used with permission.

 

 

Date Number Name Direction Nationality
19.1.2015 Shaktar Northbound Russia
19.1.2015 KIL-158 Northbound Russia
19.1.2015 150 Saratov Northbound Russia
17.1.2015 131 Moskva Northbound Russia
14.1.2015 75 USS Donald Cook Southbound USA
13.1.2015 031 Aleksandr Otrakovski Northbound Russia
11.1.2015 PM-138 PM-138 Southbound Russia
10.1.2015 156 Yamal Southbound Russia
10.1.2015 110 Alexander Shabalin Southbound Russia
5.1.2015 150 Saratov Southbound Russia
5.1.2015 KIL-158 Southbound Russia

I have archived the list of the Russian warship movements in 2013 and the list of foreign warship movements in 2014.

TCG Büyükada Sets Sail For Indian Ocean

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It will be spring when they return.

 

Today, on a sunny winter day, with a solemn ceremony the Ada class corvette F-512 TCG Büyükada set sail to the Indian Ocean.

On board are one S-72B Seahawk helicopter, tail number TCB-69, one naval special forces team and 124 sailors.

During this 87 day deployment, TCG Büyükada will join the task force CTF-151 and conduct anti-piracy patrols in Gulf of Aden and off the coast of Somalia.

The warship will participate Pakistani led naval exercise AMAN 2015 and Kuwaiti exercise Eagles 2015.

With this deployment of TCG Büyükada, Turkey wants to increase its presence in the region and develop good working relationship with local navies. Another obvious aim of the deployment is to present and show the Ada class corvette to other navies planning of purchasing similar warships. Showing the flag, increasing the presence and bolstering defence export opportunities are classic usage of naval forces.

The corvette is expected to arrive back in Turkey on 15 April 2015.
More photos from the farewell ceremony:

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The executive officer of TCG Büyükada, Lieutenant Commander Toker, with his family.

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TCG Büyükada ready for the deployment.

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The crew of TCG Büyükada waiting for the order to man the ship.

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The commanding officer of TCG Büyükada, Lieutenant Commander Baysal delivering his speech.

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The commanding officer of TCG Büyükada, Lieutenant Commander Baysal

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Foreign Warship On Bosphorus 2015 (Part 3)

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USS Donald Cook passing through the Bosphorus. Photo: Yörük Işık. Used with permission.

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USS Donald Cook passing through the Bosphorus. Photo: Kerim Bozkurt. Used with permission.

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USS Donald Cook passing through the Bosphorus.

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USS Donald Cook passing through the Bosphorus. She was escorted by Turkish Coast Guard vessel SG-312.

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Turkish Coat Guard vessel SG-312 escorting USS Donald Cook.

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USS Donald Cook passing through the Bosphorus. Photo: Alper Böler. Used with permission.

 

Today US Navy destroyer USS Donald Cook passed through the Bosphorus and ended her 21 days in the Black Sea.

This year the list will be in reverse order: The older sightings will be at the bottom of the list. I think this will make reading the list easier.

Date Number Name Direction Nationality
14.1.2015 75 USS Donald Cook Southbound USA
13.1.2015 031 Aleksandr Otrakovski Northbound Russia
11.1.2015 PM-138 PM-138 Southbound Russia
10.1.2015 156 Yamal Southbound Russia
10.1.2015 110 Alexander Shabalin Southbound Russia
5.1.2015 150 Saratov Southbound Russia
5.1.2015 KIL-158 Southbound Russia

I have archived the list of the Russian warship movements in 2013 and the list of foreign warship movements in 2014.

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