Fishing Wars, Aegean Style (Part 2)

The fishing wars in Northern Aegean goes on. Today a new video was released showing a dog fight (I don’t know if this is a correct term to use on sea) between Turkish and Greek Coast Guard vessels.

Being smaller the Greek boat has a higher degree of maneuverability but the Kaan 33 class, Turkish Coast Guard boat TCSG-308 was able to prevented the Greek Coast Guard boats coming to close to Turkish fishing boats.

 

Fishing Wars, Aegean Style

This video was taken on board of a Turkish fishing boat in Northern Aegean. The Kaan 33 class, Turkish Coast Guard boat TCSG-308 prevented the Greek Coast Guard boats coming to close to Turkish fishing boats. On sea, size does matter.

 

 

Turkish Navy Destroys 20 Sea Mines

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A mine, laying on the sea floor, seen through the camera of a ROV. Photo: Official Turkish Navy photo.

Turkish Navy announced today that 20 mines from World War 1 and World War 2 has been found in Northern and Central Aegean and destroyed by Turkish mine hunters.

These mines were destroyed in two separate occasions, on 30 November – 1 December 2013 and on 13 – 15 January 2014.

Every year, mines from World War 1 and World War 2, either wash up to shore, get tangled in the nets of the fishermen or found by divers and get destroyed. Mines, whether buried under dirt or lurking in the deeps of the seas are in my humble view are the most loathsome weapons as they can be still deadly after decades.

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Photo: Official Turkish Navy photo

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Photo: Official Turkish Navy photo

 

Lest We Forget: DM-357 TCG Muavenet

I have missed the anniversary of the incident of TCG Muavenet being hit. So I am reposting one of my earlier post about this incident:

DM-357 TCG Muavenet was a special ship for me. This picture of hers, which I have taken back in 29 October 1989, was my very first photo to be published in Jane’s Fighting Ships in 1991 edition.

On 2th October 1992, 11 minutes past midnight, during the NATO’s Display Determination ’92 naval exercise, two Sea Sparrow surface to air missiles fired accidentally from the aircraft carrier CV-60 USS Saratoga, hit the bridge of the Turkish destroyer DM-357 TCG Muavenet. 5 sailors including the commander of the ship were killed instantly and 15 badly hurt. A fire broke out on board. At the time of the incident two ships were 3 miles apart and were streaming north in the Aegean.

According the United States Court of Appeals, Eleventh Circuit the fateful events unfolded as follows:

“On October 1, 1992, the Combat Direction Center Officer aboard the Saratoga decided to launch a simulated attack on nearby opposition forces utilizing the Sea Sparrow missile system. After securing the approval of the Saratoga’s Commanding Officer and the Battle Group Commander, the Combat Direction Center Officer implemented the simulated assault plan. Without providing prior notice, officers on the Saratoga woke the enlisted Sea Sparrow missile team and directed them to conduct the simulated attack.

Certain members of the missile firing team were not told that the exercise was a drill, rather than an actual event. As the drill progressed, the missile system operator used language to indicate he was preparing to fire a live missile, but due to the absence of standard terminology, the responsible officers failed to appreciate the significance of the terms used and the requests made. Specifically, the Target Acquisition System operator issued the command “arm and tune,” terminology the console operators understood to require arming of the missiles in preparation for actual firing.

The officers supervising the drill did not realize that “arm and tune” signified a live firing. As a result, the Saratoga inadvertently fired two live Sea Sparrow missiles at the TCG Muavenet. Both missiles struck the TCG Muavenet, resulting in several deaths and numerous injuries.”

According to a report prepared by Turkish Naval Military Prosecutor’s Office on November 11, 1992 the Saratoga was with the visible horizon and the launch of the missiles were observed on TCG Muavenet.

One of the missiles hit the ship approximately after a flight of ten seconds. The first missile hit the front of the ships bridge and destroyed it. The second missile exploded in the air probably because the blast of the first missile and peppered the ship with shrapnel. Ships radar antenna, forward gun turrets, hedgehog launcher suffered from the shrapnel damage. The pieces of the second missile penetrated the forward gun turret, cabins of the supply officer and XO.

A fire started at the ammunition chamber of the Hedgehog system. The explosion of the Hedgehog rounds would have caused the loss of the ships. After the hits general quarters were sounded and the fire fighting teams started to tackle the fire. On the other hand the damage control teams were throwing the ready ammunition in the forward gun turrets and other explosives near the fire over the board as a safety measure.

When the situation was under control TCG Muavenet was towed to the Gölcük Naval Base. And the exercise continued as planned.

The damage to the old ship was extensive. She was not useable anymore therefore she was decommissioned right away. Later US gave Knox class FFG-1093 USS Capodanno as compensation.

The fire was under control in 10 minutes but the water caused damage in the decks that were not harmed in the initial blast.

These two photos were taken after TGC Muavenet was towed to Gölcük Naval Base.

The extend of the damage resulting both from missile impact and fire is obvious. It was quite a skill to bring the fire under control before reached to the gun turret in B position. If the fire has spread further to the turrets and ammunition chambers of the guns, the she would not have survived.

All the fire fighting and damage control efforts were done in the absence of the commander of the ship. This fact speaks for the professionalism of the officers and the bravery of the whole crew. They simply did not give up the ship.

Commander Kudret Güngör
Ensign Alertunga Akan
Petty Officer 3th Class Serkan Aktepe
Sergant Mustafa Kılınç
Private Recep Akan

Paid the ultimate price for the defence of their country.

For further reading:
US Navy Court of Inquiry

Turkish Navy Court of Inquiry

Wikipedia

An interesting but technical legal article about why USA did not paid indemnities to the Turkish sailors

Greek Submarine Ran Aground

Two tugs assits the grounded submarine Proteus. Photo: Flashnews.gr

Two tugs assits the grounded submarine Proteus. Photo: Flashnews.gr

According to Greek defence.point.gr, one Greek submarine has ran aground in Souda Bay, Crete.

As announced by the Navy General Staff, the Submarine PROTEUS during sailing in the bay of Souda Bay, Crete, and during evasive ship moved near shore and epakoumvise an ancient underwater pier.

No member of the crew was injured, the submarine is not a security problem and there has been no damage.

Perform actions for detachment of the ship and return to Naval Base Souda for scrutiny.

The 209 Type 1100 class submarine S-113 HS Proteus which ran aground was one of the four submarines which recevied and upgrade in Greek service. HS Proteus and her sisters were given a “weapons discharge and fire control update” as early as 1991‐1992, enabling them to fire Sub‐Harpoon anti‐ship missiles.

The modernisation package included Sub Harpoon, flank array sonar, Unisys FCS, Sperry Mk 29 Mod 3 inertial navigation system, GPS and Argos ESM.

Turkey Conducted Anadolu Yıldızı Serach And Rescue Exercise

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AS 532AL Cougar helicopter of Turkish Air Force hoists the rescue swimmer and the simulated victim out of the water

Today the Turkish Navy also conducted a search and rescue exercise, in the international waters and airspace between Lesbos and Chios in the Aegean.

According to AA news agency the F-245 TCG Oruçreis  frigate, one corvette, two patrol boats, two coasts guard vessels and numerous air units have participated in the exercise. On board of TCG Oruçreis were 40 military attaches from 22 nations as observers.

The land part of the exercise will be conducted on 19 April 2013.

Here is the Google translation of a news article about the exercise.

Land Forces Command and Control Division Director Colonel Ramadan, Erdogan administration within the framework of the host’s House briefing Press Information Center, which serve as search and rescue activities in a race against time, must have good organization and staff, he said.

Erdogan, “the Turkish Armed Forces (TSK), the Presidency of the Turkish General Staff in search and rescue co-ordination center, which is formed on the search and rescue search and rescue search and rescue co-ordination centers and rescue all kinds of associations working in the organization to respond to the request has a 24-hour,” he said.

Turkey Since 2006, satellite-assisted search and rescue system

(COSPAS-SARSAT) Pointing out that the country of the service provider Erdogan, the Turkish Armed Forces search and rescue elements, Transport, Maritime Affairs and Communications Ministry Main Search and Rescue Coordination Centre (AECC) to do the exercise with the participation of the Turkish search and rescue region, including the Aegean Sea on Thursday, April 18 international waters and airspace between Lesbos and Chios Islands, to be held on April 19 in the Smoky Mountain town of Izmir Menemen said.

And here is a link to a good video of the exercise: http://www.aa.com.tr/tr/mod/video-galerisi/955864/anadolu-yildizi-tatbikati

Greek Navy Performed Live Missile Shootings

8mOn the 16th February Greek Navy conducted an exercise with live missile shootings. The exercise was held in south east of Crete.

According to official website of Greek Navy:

One land based mobile battery fired an Exoet missile, one S-70B Seahawk helicopter fired a AGM-114 Hellifre missile, the fast attack craft P-26 Degiannis fired a Penguin Mk.2 missile. The special forces team on Degiannis even fired an AT-4 anti tank missile.

The Greek armed forces are conducting a lot live missile shooting during their exercises. I guess expending a missile that, has a very little shelf life left, is cheaper than reconditioning it. Missile shootings also boosts the morale.

According to the official website of Greek Navy the target of these munitions was the decommissioned corvette Elefthria.

By the way “elefthria” means “freedom” in English.

A Hundred Years Old Mine Was Found In Didim

The mine. Photo from Hürriyet.com

On 31st May 2012, an old and rusty mine was found in a popular beach in Didim, Aydın.

A swimmer notified the local  police about an odd-shaped rusty metal object laying on the sea floor after she/he injured her/his feed by it. The local police turned to the coast guard for help. Eventually the Navy EOD teams arrived at the beach and after two days work the mine was dragged out of the water to be disposed.

The naval EOD experts stated that the mine was from First World War and was at least one hundred years old and thankfully it was no longer functional.

Click here to watch a video of the salvage of the mine. Every year several old mines are found in the waters around Turkey.

The mine in close. Photo from Stargündem.com

USS Enterprise In Piraeus

USS Enterprise (left) and USS Vicksburg (right) in Pireus.
Photo: enkripto.com

The US Navy aircraft carrier CVN-65 USS Enterprise arrived in Piraeus for a 3 day visit.

The renowned aircraft carrier is conducting her last deployment. She is scheduled for decommissioning on 1 December 2012. She arrived in Greece with Ticonderoga class cruiser CG-69 USS Vicksburg. This may be the last time for both ships to spend in Piraeus. Like USS Enterprise this is the last deployment for USS Vicksburg too. She will be deactivated in 2013.

The Enterprise Carrier Strike Group is comprised of CVN-65 USS Enterprise, Carrier Air Wing 1, Destroyer Squadron 2, USS Vicksburg (CG 69), and guided-missile destroyers DDG -78 USS Porter, DDG-94 USS Nitze, and DDG -95  USS James E. Williams.

Catch Of The Day: A G7A Torpedo

The G7A training torpedo caught by a Turkish fishing boat.

On 10th March 2012, the fishing boat M/V Yeni Asya returned home with a very unusual catch: a G7A torpedo.

The fishing boat found the torpedo dangled in its nets as they were fishing off the coast of Foça, İzmir. The waters around Foça, located at the entrance of Bay of İzmir is one of the popular exercise areas of Turkish Navy.

The fishermen realized that it the torpedo was an inert training torpedo without a warhead as they have encountered similar torpedoes before dully informed the local coast guard station and the harbour master. After the M/V Yeni Asya returned to Foça harbor with the torpedo hanging astern, experts examined the catch. Later it was decided to bring to torpedo to a close by naval base where it will be destroyed.

Originally designed for the use of the U-Boots during the 2. World War, the G7A torpedo is used by Kartal class fast attack craft. These vessels build in Germany as a modified Zobel class fast attack craft carry two forward facing 533mm torpedo tubes, one on each side armed with one G7A torpedoes.

Click here for a video of the incident.

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